Bronchiolitis in infants steroids

Forced passive expiratory techniques failed to show an effect on severity of bronchiolitis in terms of time to recovery (two trials, 509 participants) and time to clinical stability (one trial , 99 participants analysed). This evidence is of high quality and corresponds to patients with severe bronchiolitis. Furthermore, there is also high quality evidence that these techniques are related to an increased risk of transient respiratory destabilisation ( risk ratio ( RR ) , 95% confidence interval ( CI ) to , one trial ) and vomiting during the procedure ( RR , 95% CI to , one trial ). Results are inconclusive for bradycardia with desaturation ( RR , 95% CI to , one trial ) and bradycardia without desaturation ( RR , 95% CI to , one trial ), due to the limited precision of estimators. However, in mild to moderate bronchiolitis patients, forced expiration combined with conventional techniques produced an immediate relief of disease severity (one trial , 13 participants).

Bronchiolitis is a common cause of illness and is the leading cause of hospitalization in infants and young children. Treatment includes measures to ensure that the child consumes adequate fluids and is able to breathe without significant difficulty. Most children begin to improve two to five days after first developing breathing difficulties, but wheezing can last for a week or longer. Bronchiolitis can cause serious illness in some children. Infants who are very young, born early, have lung or heart disease, or have difficulty fighting infections or handling oral secretions are more likely to have severe disease with bronchiolitis. It is important to be aware of the signs and symptoms that require evaluation and treatment.

Until 2014 a mainstay of management of bronchiolitis involved the administration of inhaled bronchodilators. Evaluation of several agents demonstrated a potential slight improvement of respiratory distress symptoms but no long-term benefits (for example, duration of symptoms, shortening of the need for supplemental oxygen, etc.). Because there are children who have asthma exacerbations during the bronchiolitis season, some centers will provide a single inhalation bronchodilator therapy treatment. Should a substantial improvement be demonstrated, a consideration of further similar therapy can be considered. Children who do not demonstrate such an improvement need no further inhaled bronchodilators. Chest physiotherapy has not been demonstrated to be of benefit for pulmonary symptoms and is thus not recommended.

A virus was detected in % of the 182 infants. The most frequently detected viruses were RSV (%), hBoV (%) and RV (%). Infants with dual infections (RSV and hBoV) had a higher clinical severity score and more days of hospitalisation than infants with RSV, RV and hBoV bronchiolitis (mean+/-SD: + vs +/- vs +/- vs +/-, p<; and +/- vs +/- vs +/- vs +/- days; p<). Infants with RV infection had higher blood eosinophil counts than infants with bronchiolitis from RSV and hBoV (307+/-436 vs 138+/-168 vs 89+/-19 n/mm(3); p<).

Bronchiolitis in infants steroids

bronchiolitis in infants steroids

A virus was detected in % of the 182 infants. The most frequently detected viruses were RSV (%), hBoV (%) and RV (%). Infants with dual infections (RSV and hBoV) had a higher clinical severity score and more days of hospitalisation than infants with RSV, RV and hBoV bronchiolitis (mean+/-SD: + vs +/- vs +/- vs +/-, p<; and +/- vs +/- vs +/- vs +/- days; p<). Infants with RV infection had higher blood eosinophil counts than infants with bronchiolitis from RSV and hBoV (307+/-436 vs 138+/-168 vs 89+/-19 n/mm(3); p<).

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