Plantar fasciitis steroid injection recovery


If you suffer from plantar fasciitis, you might think perhaps you should rest your feet, but it’s actually better for you to keep on the move. Plantar fasciitis affects the band of tissue connecting your heel bone to your toes, and can cause stabbing pains when walking. A treatment for it is to keep moving, but make sure you don’t overdo it. Keep your mileage and speed down if you begin experiencing pain, and place an ice pack under your foot for 15 minutes after you’ve finished walking. An alternative is to roll a frozen bottle of water under your foot for 10 to 15 minutes instead. Adding support to your foot can also help, so using an insole in your shoe or wrapping your foot with athletic tape is also recommended. To find out more about this, read this guide to Walking With Plantar Fasciitis . 

How long does the Cortisone last?

While each patient is different, cortisone injections usually last around 3 weeks. In most cases, however, the shots can last for up to 3 months. While the cortisone shots are surely an option, you must be your own advocate. This includes frequent visits to the podiatrist to monitor any changes in pain management. You must also notify your physician if the pain returns at mild to excruciating levels. Your foot specialist will continue to work in pinpointing the exact causes of your foot discomfort. This can include stress, along with obesity and especially injuries related to sports or even walking. The ultimate goal in using cortisone shots is to reduce the pain, swelling, and inflammation associated with PF. If after 3 weeks you still see no significant change, your podiatrist will evaluate the situation and recommend further steps to be taken (. orthotic therapy and/or taping )

Interesting that you don’t mention what I find to be the #1 cause of plantar fascitis. It is trigger points in the soleus muscle which cannot be stretched in the same manner that is used to stretch the other calf muscle (the gastrocnemius). You can work the foot and heeel all day long and not resolve the problem until you get rid of the triggr points in the soleus and learn how to stretch it properly.
I am a massage therapist and you don’t even mention seeing this group of professionals who can be very helpful in working with someone. Massage the calf; do NOT massage the foot. Once you have gotten rid of the trigger points and gotten the calf muscles in good shape you can then massage the foot…..but chances are you wont’ need to. It will have become a non-issue.

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of foot pain in adults. Plantar fasciitis is caused by a strain of the ligaments in an area of the foot called the plantar fascia ( figure 1 ). The plantar fascia (pronounced FASH-uh) is a thick, pearly white tissue with long fibers that starts at the heel bone and fans out along the under surface of the foot to the toes. The fascia provides support as the toes bear the body’s weight when the heel rises during walking. Jumping or prolonged standing may strain the plantar fascia. The outcome for people with plantar fasciitis is generally good, with approximately 80 percent of people having no pain within one year.

Lolol..well if "misery loves company" can be helpful then I'm glad but it usually isn't such a great thing. However, it does help to vent and talk to others who know you aren't exaggerating your pain. I wish we could help to heal each other...then I would really be thankful. Maybe we will huh? We will keep each other informed and hopefully we can find ways to ease the pain. My Dr won't give pain meds!!! I think I should own stock in a the Makers of Advil bc that's what I take all the time...it doesn't take the pain but it does seem to round the pointed corners sometimes...just barely takes the edge off. We will talk more my friend.....

Plantar fasciitis steroid injection recovery

plantar fasciitis steroid injection recovery

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of foot pain in adults. Plantar fasciitis is caused by a strain of the ligaments in an area of the foot called the plantar fascia ( figure 1 ). The plantar fascia (pronounced FASH-uh) is a thick, pearly white tissue with long fibers that starts at the heel bone and fans out along the under surface of the foot to the toes. The fascia provides support as the toes bear the body’s weight when the heel rises during walking. Jumping or prolonged standing may strain the plantar fascia. The outcome for people with plantar fasciitis is generally good, with approximately 80 percent of people having no pain within one year.

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