Taking testosterone steroids

Women can take testosterone as a cream, through a patch or in the form of pellet implants, which have the highest consistency of delivery. Synthesized from yams or soybeans, and compounded of pure, bioidentical testosterone, the pellets, each slightly larger than a grain of rice, are inserted just beneath the skin in the hip in a one-minute outpatient procedure. They dissolve slowly over three to four months, releasing small amounts of testosterone into the blood stream, but speeding up when needed by the body -- during strenuous activities, for example -- and slowing down during quiet times, a feature no other form of hormone therapy can provide.

A recent case of a 51 year old male with an interest in testosterone replacement illustrates the benefits of the multi-parametric prostate MRI scan. Noting a PSA value of only ng/ml; the digital rectal exam (DRE) identified an area of interest on the left side, albeit, it was not definitive for prostate cancer. Neither the gray scale ultrasound nor Color Flow Doppler ultrasound evaluation suggested any specific abnormality consistent with the area of interest previously identified on DRE. An MRI scan was suggested as the next best step in the evaluation. The scan isolated a region of interest on the left side at the Apex to Middle portion of the prostate gland concordant with the findings on the DRE.  Based upon the findings of the MRI scan, a targeted biopsy with 6 needle cores was recommended and implemented. An Antiandrogen was initiated pre-biopsy to mitigate against “needle tracking”. Specifically, an Antiandrogen selectively blocks the receptor on the prostate cell from attracting testosterone as it exits the capsule, thereby, disabling the cells in preparation for cell death or apoptosis. The Pathology evaluation revealed a grade of cancer that was amenable to being treated conservatively or focally. In this case, the failure to use a MRI scan would have exposed this patient to the possibility of missing the cancer altogether; associated with sampling bias, a very real possibility for needle tracking (assuming cancer was found), or worse yet, the go ahead to supplement with testosterone, when in fact, the cancer was missed. Using  testosterone in this scenario would have stimulated cancer cells to grow wildly, while causing the PSA to spike abnormally, thereby, making the diagnosis of prostate cancer – a potentially uncontrollable clinical event, albeit, avoidable. Given the expertise of a Urolologic consultation, this case turned out well. The patient is now contemplating a focal treatment with high intensity focused ultrasound with a plan to supplement with testosterone once his cancer has been cured. An inability to document the resolution of prostate cancer by a repeat MRI scan and/or a stable PSA post-operatively will preclude this patient from using testosterone replacement therapy.

Because the relationship between long-term androgen use and gynecological health is not yet fully understood, and because many trans men often experience embarrassment and/or access issues over obtaining ongoing gynecological care, some may feel it is appropriate to pursue such surgeries as a preventative measure. Always discuss the latest medical research and the pros and cons of these procedures with your doctor. For more information on hysterectomy, oophorectomy, PCOS, endometrial cancer, and ovarian cancer see the hysterectomy and oophorectomy page on this web site.

Testosterone is a hormone that is produced in large amounts by males (and a little bit in females), in the testes and adrenal glands. High testosterone levels are associated with sexual performance, reproductive function, muscle mass, hair growth, aggressive, competitive behaviors, and other such manly things. Testosterone levels tend to peak at the age of 40, and slowly decline from there. Luckily, there are many things you can do to increase testosterone, so if you feel like your T levels could use a boost, you've come to the right place.

Physicians and those in the mental health fields suddenly noticed that a substantial percentage of depressed men were low T and giving them testosterone helped very often.  The subject of Testosterone and Depression is so important that I did a page on it and documented the many kind of depression and mood conditions that HRT can help with.  In my opinion, if a man is struggling with depression, one of the first numbers that should be pulled is testosterone.

Taking testosterone steroids

taking testosterone steroids

Testosterone is a hormone that is produced in large amounts by males (and a little bit in females), in the testes and adrenal glands. High testosterone levels are associated with sexual performance, reproductive function, muscle mass, hair growth, aggressive, competitive behaviors, and other such manly things. Testosterone levels tend to peak at the age of 40, and slowly decline from there. Luckily, there are many things you can do to increase testosterone, so if you feel like your T levels could use a boost, you've come to the right place.

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